ExteriorMusicServiceRev Hoang and LeeCeilingDAvid McBeth and LeeNU mealLinda Ramsey and pupsPainting crossLee and childrenHunger offeringHalloweenDavid McBethYogaMagic card tourney 2People looking at memorial bricksGirlscout workshopGroup in gardenPrayer GardenNU kids in December 2013MealNU girl on tractorGarden boxes 2014Richard and Nicolle eating birthday cake 5.2014Lee and Stuart eating bday cake 5.2014Choir THe mobile meals gangJacky on community service dayyoga groupSusan on Community service day 2014
  • What Do You Think?

    After exploring Matthew’s parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30), each of us was left with the question, what is my image of God? How do I see God? How do I imagine God? Is God harsh and judging like the master in the parable and the God of wrath we heard about in Zephaniah 1:1-18? Or is God “merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness” as revealed to Moses in Exodus 34:6 and portrayed in the Psalms such as Psalm 86 and145? Is God one or the other or does God contain both qualities? How does my view of God affect my actions? How do I respond to God’s abundant grace and wealth of blessings?

    To find God’s grace in this parable, we need only look at the amount of talents that the master gives to each servant. A talent was the largest unit of money in ancient Palestine. The denarius was the daily wage for a laborer and there were 6000 denarii in one talent. One talent was like receiving more than 16 years of salary in a lump sum. If we use the current median income in Weakley County of $34,000, then one talent would be worth over $500,000. The servant who receives two talents is looking at over a million dollars and the one with five is dealing with more than 2½ million. This amount is an extravagant abundance of money.

    Professor Dirk Lange at Luther Seminary suggests that we focus on the master’s generosity.1 Perhaps the master is intended to represent Jesus, who continually invites his followers into an abundant life of grace and love. Maybe the emphasis should be on the gift of talents as an invitation to share the master’s joy, an invitation into discipleship. From this viewpoint, Professor Lange draws the conclusion that the third servant decided not to accept the invitation. The servant not only hid the talent, but he also missed the opportunity to share the master’s joy.

    What do you think?

    Peace,

    Lee

    “For it is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money.

             -Matthew 25:14-18

  • What Do You Think?

    After exploring Matthew’s parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30), each of us was left with the question, what is my image of God? How do I see God? How do I imagine God? Is God harsh and judging like the master in the parable and the God of wrath we heard about in Zephaniah 1:1-18?… Read more

  • What Do You Think?

    After exploring Matthew’s parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30), each of us was left with the question, what is my image of God? How do I see God? How do I imagine God? Is God harsh and judging like the master in the parable and the God of wrath we heard about in Zephaniah 1:1-18?… Read more

  • No matter where you are in your spiritual journey you are welcome at Trinity. We are a community of faith that explores questions and new ideas as together we grow in love, grace and service as followers of Jesus.